Modern Developments specialises in the design, supply, installation and commissioning of renewable heating systems for domestic and commercial applications.
Our installations are not only sustainable and cost-effective but also help reduce carbon emissions. We are MCS accredited and are able to offer the Renewable Heat Incentive.

+Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI)

The Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) is the world’s first long-term financial support programme for renewable heat.
The RHI pays participants of the scheme that generate and use renewable energy to heat their buildings. By increasing the generation of heat from renewable energy sources (instead of fossil fuels), the RHI helps the UK to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to meet targets for reducing the effects of climate change..

+Domestic RHI
Launched 9 April 2014 and open to homeowners, private landlords, social landlords and self-builders.
+Non-domestic RHI

Launched in November 2011 to provide payments to industry, businesses and public sector organisations.

+Interest-free Loans

The Scottish Government is running an interest free loan scheme for householders who wish to install a renewables system. The scheme offers loans of up to £10,000 and will be available on a first come first served basis.
Full details are available via the following link:

Loan Scheme

Wood-fuelled heating systems, also called biomass systems, burn wood pellets, chips or logs to to provide warmth in a single room or to power central heating and hot water boilers.
A biomass boiler burns logs, pellets or chips, and is connected to a central heating and hot water system.

The benefits of Biomass Heating

  • Affordable heating fuel: although the price of wood fuel varies considerably, it is often cheaper than other heating options.
  • Financial support: wood fuel boiler systems could benefit from the Renewable Heat Incentive.
  • A low-carbon option: the carbon dioxide emitted when wood is burned is the same amount that was absorbed over the months and years that the plant was growing. The process is sustainable as long as new plants continue to grow in place of those used for fuel.
    Choosing a wood-fuelled heating system
  • Boiler or stove? Boilers can be used in place of a standard gas or oil boiler to heat radiators for a whole house, and to heat the hot water. Stoves are used to heat a single room, usually in conjunction with other heating systems, but may also have a back boiler to provide hot water.
  • Chips, pellets or logs? Chips are not suitable for heating a single house, but can be used to heat larger buildings or groups of houses. Pellets are much easier to use and much more controllable than logs; pellet boilers can run automatically in much the same way that gas or oil boilers operate. Log-burning stoves and boilers have to be filled with wood by hand; most pellet and chip burners use automatic fuel feeders which refill them at regular intervals. Logs require considerably more work, and you will need a lot of logs to heat a whole house, but they can be cheaper than pellets if you have a good local supply.
  • Do you have a local fuel supplier? Some companies now offer deliveries of pellets anywhere in mainland Britain and Northern Ireland; supply of logs is much more variable.
  • Do you have space? Wood boilers are larger than gas or oil equivalents. You will also need space to store the fuel: somewhere that’s handy for deliveries but also appropriate for feeding the boiler.
  • Do you have somewhere to put the flue? You will need a flue which meets the regulations for wood-burning appliances: a new insulated stainless steel flue pipe or an existing chimney – though chimneys normally need lining to make them safe and legal.
  • Do you need permission? You may not need planning permission, but you should always check.

Heat water for your home using energy from the sun.
Solar water heating systems use free heat from the sun to warm domestic hot water. A conventional boiler or immersion heater can be used to make the water hotter, or to provide hot water when solar energy is unavailable.

 The benefits of solar water heating

  • Hot water throughout the year: the system works all year round, though you’ll need to heat the water further with a boiler or immersion heater during the winter months.
  • Cut your bills: sunlight is free, so once you’ve paid for the initial installation your hot water costs will be reduced.
  • Cut your carbon footprint: solar hot water is a green, renewable heating system and can reduce your carbon dioxide emissions.
How do solar water heating systems work?
Solar water heating systems use solar panels, called collectors, fitted to your roof. These collect heat from the sun and use it to heat up water which is stored in a hot water cylinder. A boiler or immersion heater can be used as a back up to heat the water further to reach the temperature you want.
Larger solar panels can also be arranged to provide some contribution to heating your home as well. However, the amount of heat provided is generally very small and it is not normally considered worth while.
Is solar water heating right for your home?
You’ll need around five square metres of roof space which faces east to west through south and receives direct sunlight for the main part of the day.
The panels don’t have to be mounted on a roof: they can be fixed to a frame on a flat roof or hanging from a wall. If a dedicated solar cylinder is not already installed then you will usually need to replace the existing cylinder, or add a dedicated cylinder with a solar heating coil. Most conventional boiler and hot water cylinder systems are compatible with solar water heating. But if your boiler is a combination boiler (combi) and you don’t currently have a hot water tank, a solar hot water system may not be compatible.
At Modern Developments we will be able to assess your home and help you choose the best setup to meet your needs.

Heat Pumps – Air Source

Air source heat pumps absorb heat from the outside air. This heat can then be used to heat radiators, underfloor heating systems, or warm air convectors and hot water in your home.
An air source heat pump extracts heat from the outside air in the same way that a fridge extracts heat from its inside. It can get heat from the air even when the temperature is as low as -15° C. Heat pumps have some impact on the environment as they need electricity to run, but the heat they extract from the ground, air, or water is constantly being renewed naturally.

The benefits of air source heat pumps

  • could lower your fuel bills, especially if you are replacing conventional electric heating
  • could provide you with an income through the government’s Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI)
  • could lower your home’s carbon emissions, depending on which fuel you are replacing
  • don’t need fuel deliveries
  • can heat your home and provide and hot water
  • need little maintenance

Unlike gas and oil boilers, heat pumps deliver heat at lower temperatures over much longer periods. During the winter they may need to be on constantly to heat your home efficiently. You will also notice that radiators won’t feel as hot to the touch as they might do when you are using a gas or oil boiler.

How do air source heat pumps work?

Heat from the air is absorbed at low temperature into a fluid. This fluid then passes through a compressor where its temperature is increased, and transfers its higher temperature heat to the heating and hot water circuits of the house. There are two main types of air source heat pump system:

  • An air-to-water system distributes heat via your wet central heating system. Heat pumps work much more efficiently at a lower temperature than a standard boiler system would. So they are more suitable for underfloor heating systems or larger radiators, which give out heat at lower temperatures over longer periods of time.
  • An air-to-air system produces warm air which is circulated by fans to heat your home. They are unlikely to provide you with hot water as well.

Is an air source heat pump suitable for me?

To tell if an air source heat pump is right for you, there are a few key questions to consider:

  • Do you have somewhere to put it? You’ll need a place outside your home where a unit can be fitted to a wall or placed on the ground. It will need plenty of space around it to get a good flow of air. A sunny wall is ideal.
  • Is your home well insulated? Since air source heat pumps work best when producing heat at a lower temperature than traditional boilers, it’s essential that your home is insulated well for the heating system to be effective.
  • What fuel will you be replacing? The system will pay for itself much more quickly if it’s replacing an electricity or coal heating system. Heat pumps may not be the best option for homes using mains gas.
  • What type of heating system will you use? Air source heat pumps can perform better with underfloor heating systems or warm air heating than with radiator-based systems because of the lower water temperatures required.
  • Is the system intended for a new development? Combining the installation with other building work can reduce the cost of installing the system.
+ Biomass

Wood-fuelled heating systems, also called biomass systems, burn wood pellets, chips or logs to to provide warmth in a single room or to power central heating and hot water boilers.
A biomass boiler burns logs, pellets or chips, and is connected to a central heating and hot water system.

The benefits of Biomass Heating

  • Affordable heating fuel: although the price of wood fuel varies considerably, it is often cheaper than other heating options.
  • Financial support: wood fuel boiler systems could benefit from the Renewable Heat Incentive.
  • A low-carbon option: the carbon dioxide emitted when wood is burned is the same amount that was absorbed over the months and years that the plant was growing. The process is sustainable as long as new plants continue to grow in place of those used for fuel.
    Choosing a wood-fuelled heating system
  • Boiler or stove? Boilers can be used in place of a standard gas or oil boiler to heat radiators for a whole house, and to heat the hot water. Stoves are used to heat a single room, usually in conjunction with other heating systems, but may also have a back boiler to provide hot water.
  • Chips, pellets or logs? Chips are not suitable for heating a single house, but can be used to heat larger buildings or groups of houses. Pellets are much easier to use and much more controllable than logs; pellet boilers can run automatically in much the same way that gas or oil boilers operate. Log-burning stoves and boilers have to be filled with wood by hand; most pellet and chip burners use automatic fuel feeders which refill them at regular intervals. Logs require considerably more work, and you will need a lot of logs to heat a whole house, but they can be cheaper than pellets if you have a good local supply.
  • Do you have a local fuel supplier? Some companies now offer deliveries of pellets anywhere in mainland Britain and Northern Ireland; supply of logs is much more variable.
  • Do you have space? Wood boilers are larger than gas or oil equivalents. You will also need space to store the fuel: somewhere that’s handy for deliveries but also appropriate for feeding the boiler.
  • Do you have somewhere to put the flue? You will need a flue which meets the regulations for wood-burning appliances: a new insulated stainless steel flue pipe or an existing chimney – though chimneys normally need lining to make them safe and legal.
  • Do you need permission? You may not need planning permission, but you should always check.
+ Solar Thermal

Heat water for your home using energy from the sun.
Solar water heating systems use free heat from the sun to warm domestic hot water. A conventional boiler or immersion heater can be used to make the water hotter, or to provide hot water when solar energy is unavailable.

 The benefits of solar water heating

  • Hot water throughout the year: the system works all year round, though you’ll need to heat the water further with a boiler or immersion heater during the winter months.
  • Cut your bills: sunlight is free, so once you’ve paid for the initial installation your hot water costs will be reduced.
  • Cut your carbon footprint: solar hot water is a green, renewable heating system and can reduce your carbon dioxide emissions.
How do solar water heating systems work?
Solar water heating systems use solar panels, called collectors, fitted to your roof. These collect heat from the sun and use it to heat up water which is stored in a hot water cylinder. A boiler or immersion heater can be used as a back up to heat the water further to reach the temperature you want.
Larger solar panels can also be arranged to provide some contribution to heating your home as well. However, the amount of heat provided is generally very small and it is not normally considered worth while.
Is solar water heating right for your home?
You’ll need around five square metres of roof space which faces east to west through south and receives direct sunlight for the main part of the day.
The panels don’t have to be mounted on a roof: they can be fixed to a frame on a flat roof or hanging from a wall. If a dedicated solar cylinder is not already installed then you will usually need to replace the existing cylinder, or add a dedicated cylinder with a solar heating coil. Most conventional boiler and hot water cylinder systems are compatible with solar water heating. But if your boiler is a combination boiler (combi) and you don’t currently have a hot water tank, a solar hot water system may not be compatible.
At Modern Developments we will be able to assess your home and help you choose the best setup to meet your needs.
+ Heat Pumps

Heat Pumps – Air Source

Air source heat pumps absorb heat from the outside air. This heat can then be used to heat radiators, underfloor heating systems, or warm air convectors and hot water in your home.
An air source heat pump extracts heat from the outside air in the same way that a fridge extracts heat from its inside. It can get heat from the air even when the temperature is as low as -15° C. Heat pumps have some impact on the environment as they need electricity to run, but the heat they extract from the ground, air, or water is constantly being renewed naturally.

The benefits of air source heat pumps

  • could lower your fuel bills, especially if you are replacing conventional electric heating
  • could provide you with an income through the government’s Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI)
  • could lower your home’s carbon emissions, depending on which fuel you are replacing
  • don’t need fuel deliveries
  • can heat your home and provide and hot water
  • need little maintenance

Unlike gas and oil boilers, heat pumps deliver heat at lower temperatures over much longer periods. During the winter they may need to be on constantly to heat your home efficiently. You will also notice that radiators won’t feel as hot to the touch as they might do when you are using a gas or oil boiler.

How do air source heat pumps work?

Heat from the air is absorbed at low temperature into a fluid. This fluid then passes through a compressor where its temperature is increased, and transfers its higher temperature heat to the heating and hot water circuits of the house. There are two main types of air source heat pump system:

  • An air-to-water system distributes heat via your wet central heating system. Heat pumps work much more efficiently at a lower temperature than a standard boiler system would. So they are more suitable for underfloor heating systems or larger radiators, which give out heat at lower temperatures over longer periods of time.
  • An air-to-air system produces warm air which is circulated by fans to heat your home. They are unlikely to provide you with hot water as well.

Is an air source heat pump suitable for me?

To tell if an air source heat pump is right for you, there are a few key questions to consider:

  • Do you have somewhere to put it? You’ll need a place outside your home where a unit can be fitted to a wall or placed on the ground. It will need plenty of space around it to get a good flow of air. A sunny wall is ideal.
  • Is your home well insulated? Since air source heat pumps work best when producing heat at a lower temperature than traditional boilers, it’s essential that your home is insulated well for the heating system to be effective.
  • What fuel will you be replacing? The system will pay for itself much more quickly if it’s replacing an electricity or coal heating system. Heat pumps may not be the best option for homes using mains gas.
  • What type of heating system will you use? Air source heat pumps can perform better with underfloor heating systems or warm air heating than with radiator-based systems because of the lower water temperatures required.
  • Is the system intended for a new development? Combining the installation with other building work can reduce the cost of installing the system.